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Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

  • 1.  Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-18-2020 10:05
    Some members of the AoM MH community are lucky enough not to have to worry too much about journal rankings! Many management historians, however, do need to pay attention to the position in their journals in the various lists that business school deans around the world use to evaluate research outputs. The position of particular historical journals varies a bit between such lists as the CNRS list used in France, the Australian Deans List, and the ABS list.  For those of us who work in UK business schools, the ABS journal quality guide is important because the rankings of journals in it informs decisions about hiring, compensation, and the like. In recent years, some Canadian business schools have started talking more about the ABS list. For instance, I know of a business school in Ottawa that uses it. When I was on sabbatical at Copenhagen Business School, assistant professors there were being told to pay attention to this list in making their research strategies.

    Here's what the list looks like (I've pasted part of the spreadsheet with the historical journals, which are listed in alphabetical order)

    Field Journal Title AJG 2018 AJG 2015 ABS 2010
    ACCOUNT World Tax Journal 1 1  
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Accounting Historians Journal 2 2  
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Accounting History 2 2 2
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Accounting History Review (formerly Accounting, Business and Financial History) 2 2 2
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Australian Economic History Review 2 2  
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Bankhistorisches Archiv 1 1  
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Business History 3 3 4
    BUS HIST & ECON HIST Business History Review 4 4 3


    The ABS last published its list in 2018 and it has announced that it has appointed the subject experts who will be responsible for update each subject section of the list. There has been a fair bit of discussion on social media about the experts and the various personalities on this list. I guess that's to be expected. Personally, I'm pretty happy with the choice of the two individuals whose input into the business and economic history list has been requested as both a serious and dedicated scholars who have decades of experience publishing empirical work.


    I'm struck by the fact there are number of academics at Canadian universities on this list of experts.


    Anyway, I don't know if the consultation period for the making of this list is still open, but if folks want to make their opinions heard, they should probably speak up before the list is finalised. 

    Field Subject Expert
    Accounting Professor Marcia Annisette, York University, Seymour Schulich School of Business
    Professor Mark Clatworthy, University of Bristol, School of Economics, Finance and Management
    Professor Christine Cooper, Strathclyde Business School
    Business and Economic History Professor Mark Casson, University of Reading
    Professor Geoffrey G. Jones, Harvard Business School
    Economics, Econometrics
    and Statistics
    Professor Jerry Coakley, Essex Business School
    Professor Robert Taylor, Essex Business School
    Professor Tim Worrall, University of Edinburgh, School of Economics
    Entrepreneurship and Small Business
    Management
    Professor Susan Marlow, University of Birmingham, Birmingham Business School
    Professor Becky Reuber, University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management
    Finance Professor Marco Pagano, University of Naples Federico II
    Professor Nick Taylor, University of Bristol, School of Economics, Finance and Management
    Professor John Wilson, University of St. Andrews School of Management
    General Management, Ethics, Gender and
    Social Responsibility
    Professor Peter Bamberger, Tel Aviv University, Coller School of Management
    Professor Caroline Gatrell, University of Liverpool Management School
    Professor Susanna Khavul, San Jose State University/London School of Economics
    Professor Henk Volberda, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Business School
    Human Resource Management and
    Employment Studies
    Professor Pawan Budhwar, Aston Business School
    Professor Fang Lee Cooke, Monash Business School
    Professor Adrian Wilkinson, Griffith Business School
    Information Management Professor Joe Nandhakumar, Warwick Business School
    Professor Cathy Urquhart, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School
    Innovation Professor Silvia Massini, University of Manchester Alliance Manchester Business School and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research
    Professor Nola Hewitt-Dundas, Queen's Management School, Queen's University Belfast
    International Business and Area Studies Professor Jedrzej George Frynas, Open University
    Professor Heinz Tüselmann, Manchester Metropolitan University Business School (Chair)
    Management Development and Education Professor David Collings, Dublin City University Business School
    Professor Ken Starkey, Nottingham University Business School
    Marketing Professor Adam Lindgreen, Copenhagen Business School
    Professor Paurav Shukla, Southampton Business School
    Operations and Technology Management Professor Cipriano Forza, University of Padua
    Professor Christine Harland, Politecnico di Milano
    Professor Ian McCarthy, Simon Fraser University, Beedie School of Business
    Professor Bert De Reyck, University College London, School of Management
    Operations Research and Management Science Professor Bert De Reyck, University College London, School of Management
    Professor David Lane, Henley Business School
    Professor Maria Paola Scaparra, Kent Business School
    Organisational Studies Professor Nic Beech, University of Dundee
    Dr Amanda Shantz, Trinity College Dublin, Trinity Business School
    Psychology (General) Professor Julie Aitken Schermer, University of Western Ontario
    Professor Barbara Summers, Leeds University Business School
    Psychology (Organisational) Dr Julie Gore, University of Bath
    Professor David Guest, King's Business School, King's College London
    Professor Karoline Strauss, ESSEC Business School Paris
    Public Sector and Health Care Professor Rhys Andrews, Cardiff Business School
    Dr Ian Elliot,  University of Northumbria, Newcastle Business School
    Regional Studies, Planning and Environment Professor Gary Cook, University of Leeds
    Professor Phillip McCann, Sheffield University Management School
    Sector Studies Professor Peter McKiernan, Strathclyde Business School
    Professor Stephen Page, Hertfordshire Business School, University of Hertfordshire
    Professor Colin C Williams, Sheffield University Management School
    Social Sciences Professor Robert Andersen, University of Western Ontario
    Professor Julie Froud, University of Manchester Alliance Manchester Business School
    Strategy Professor Sotirios Paroutis, Warwick Business School
    Professor Ram Mudambi, Fox Business School, Temple University


    ------------------------------
    Andrew Smith
    Senior Lecturer in International Business
    Director of Research, Department of Strategy, International Business, and Entrepreneurship
    University of Liverpool Management School
    Liverpool
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-19-2020 13:47

    Dear Andrew and MH Colleagues,

    Regarding journal rankings and lists, you may find the following article just published in Academy of Management Perspectives interesting:

    Aguinis, H., Cummings, C., Ramani, R. S., & Cummings, T. G. 2020. "An A is an A:" The new bottom line for valuing academic research. Academy of Management Perspectives, 34: 135-154. This article is available at https://journals.aom.org/doi/10.5465/amp.2017.0193

    I hope this helps!

    All the best,

    --Herman.



    ------------------------------
    Herman Aguinis, Ph.D.
    Vice President & Program Chair, Academy of Management
    Avram Tucker Distinguished Scholar and Professor of Management
    The George Washington University School of Business
    Washington, DC
    http://hermanaguinis.com/
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-22-2020 07:15
    Dear Herman,

    Thanks for letting us know about your new paper, which I've read with interest. Your positive comments about the UK's ABS list and its five gradations will, I'm certain, be read with great interest on this side of the Atlantic.

    Andrew

    ------------------------------
    Andrew Smith
    University of Liverpool
    Liverpool
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-23-2020 23:53
      |   view attached
    I recently compiled a list of business and management history journlas for my personal use that this gorup might find useful in compiling a list of its own (see attached).

    Dick Hoffman
    Professor Emeritus
    Salisbury University


    Attachment(s)



  • 5.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-24-2020 09:00
    Thanks Richard for sharing. So that other people don't need to download the Word document, I have pasted your list here. Journal of Management History is highly ranked in the Australian equivalent of the ABS list, as you've noticed, which means that the publishing incentive structure for management historians in Australian business schools is a bit different that it is here in the UK.

    Business, Labor & Management History Journals

     

    Journal & url

     

    Sponsor

    Publisher

    Rating (SJR or ABD list)

    Business History

    http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/fbsh20#.V33gFaKMz3U

     

     

    Taylor & Francis

    A

    Business History Review

    http://www.hbs.edu/bhr/

    Harvard Business School

    Harvard Business School

    A

    Economic History review

     

    Wiley-Blackwell, UK

    .64

    Economy & Society

     

    Routledge
    UK

    .88

    Enterprise & Society

     

    Business History Conference

    Cambridge Univ. Press

    UK

    A (.34)

    Explorations in Economic History

    http://www.journals.elsevier.com/explorations-in-economic-history/

     

     

    Elsevier

    A

    Financial History Review

    http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=FHR

     

    Cambridge Univ.

     

    B

    Historical Studies in Industrial Relations

     

    Liverpool University

    Liverpool U.

    C

    History of Economic Ideas

    http://www.historyofeconomicideas.com/

     

     

     

    B

    International Labor and Working-Class History

    Cambridge Univ.

    Cambridge Press

    B

     

    Journal of Economic History

     

    Cambridge Univ. Press

    UK

    1.88

    Journal of Global History

     

    Cambridge Univ. Press

    UK

    .95

    Journal of Management History

    http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/jmh

    Mgt Hist Div-AoM

    Emerald

    A

    Labor: studies in the working class history of the Americas

    http://labor.dukejournals.org/

     

    Duke Univ.

    Duke U. Press

    B

    Labor History

    http://www.tandfonline.com/clah

     

    Taylor & Francis

    A

     

     

     

     

    Labor Studies Journal

    http://lsj.sagepub.com/

     

    Sage

    B

    Management Organizational History

    http://moh.sagepub.com/

     

    Sage

    C

    Working USA: The Journal of Labor and Society

    https://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/Aims_scope.asp?ref=1089-7011&site=1

     

    John Wiley

    C

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



    ------------------------------
    Andrew Smith, Senior Lecturer in International Business
    Director of Research (Strategy, International Business, and Entrepreneurship Group)
    University of Liverpool
    Liverpool
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-23-2020 03:20
    Very interesting article, Herman. Is there a clear narrative our there about the historical origins of journal lists and ranks?

    ------------------------------
    Daniel Wadhwani
    Professor
    University of Southern California
    ------------------------------



  • 7.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-23-2020 11:52

    Daniel,

    Good question! We offered a VERY brief narrative of the origins in our 2020 Academy of Management Perspectives article as follows: "Beginning in the late 1950s, business schools began the long, arduous transition from vocational-or practitioner-oriented trade schools to research-focused institutions (Bennis & O'Toole, 2005; Gordon & Howell, 1959; McLaren, 2019). Fueled by the demand for more professionally educated managers as well as stinging rebukes of the quality of the research and teaching of their faculty, business schools adopted the scholarly paradigm of the social sciences as their path to legitimacy (Bailey & Ford, 1996; Pfeffer & Fong, 2002). And this approach entailed defining and measuring the value or quality of their research production (Bennis & O'Toole, 2005)" (p. 139).

    Source: Aguinis, H., Cummings, C., Ramani, R. S., & Cummings, T. G. 2020. "An A is an A:" The new bottom line for valuing academic research. Academy of Management Perspectives, 34: 135-154. [available at http://www.hermanaguinis.com/pubs.html]

    All the best,

    --Herman. 



    ------------------------------
    Herman Aguinis, Ph.D.
    Vice President & Program Chair, Academy of Management
    Avram Tucker Distinguished Scholar and Professor of Management
    The George Washington University School of Business
    Washington, DC
    http://hermanaguinis.com/
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: Ranking of Journals: Is Input from Management Historians Needed?

    Posted 06-24-2020 09:01
    Dear Herman and Dan,

    The ABS list mentioned in Herman's paper is relatively new. I think the individuals who created the first iteration of that list  are still active. My understanding is that ancestor of today's ABS list was first prepared by individuals who did PhDs outside of management (e.g., sociology and economic history, etc)  and who wanted to figure out where they should try to submit articles. It was basically a how-to-get-ahead guide for management school neophytes that was shared around. It was later taken over by the Council of University Management Schools, a charity founded in 1989 and now known as CABS.  Today, the ABS list is used in some UK business schools to predict how a given article will be ranked by a panel of reviewers who are appointed by a government agency and who collectively determine the allocation of so-called QR funding among the UK's business schools.  For example of how QR funding works, see here 


    I don't think that anything has been published about the history of the FT50 list, formerly the FT45 list. However, a researcher who wanted to learn about the evolution of this list could easily talk to the Financial Times journalists who compile it. I'm certain they could help someone who was trying to prepare an oral history of that list. In 2017, the journalist who compiled the FT50 list was named Laurent Ortmans.

    ------------------------------
    Andrew Smith, Senior Lecturer in International Business
    Director of Research (Strategy, International Business, and Entrepreneurship Group)
    University of Liverpool
    Liverpool
    ------------------------------